Essays about: "COCA Corpus of Contemporary American English"

Showing result 1 - 5 of 11 essays containing the words COCA Corpus of Contemporary American English.

  1. 1. An Outline of the Semantic Network of the Preposition Up in American English : A Corpus Study

    University essay from Umeå universitet/Institutionen för språkstudier

    Author : Tais Fernandes Mariano; [2019]
    Keywords : Corpus Analysis; Semantic Networks; Preposition Up; American English; Second Language Learning;

    Abstract : In this study an outline is presented of the semantic network of the preposition up in American English in sentences extracted from the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA), which was done to determine what the most common uses and meanings of the preposition are, as well as to determine if most of its possible meanings are concrete or abstract. The results show that there is a salient use and also prototypical meaning of up, and that these are major factors that impact the semantic network of the preposition. READ MORE

  2. 2. A corpus-based study of Amplifiers in American English A study of the differences between amplifiers most frequently used in the different registers in the Corpus of Contemporary American English

    University essay from Göteborgs universitet/Institutionen för språk och litteraturer

    Author : Arwa Alshaar; [2017-10-19]
    Keywords : Corpus linguistics; adverbs; amplifiers; boosters;

    Abstract : Abstract: This study aims at exploring the most frequently used amplifiers inAmerican English by using the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA).The focus is to investigate amplifiers with regard to two contextual factors known toaffect the use of amplifiers: amplifier type (both maximizers and boosters) andamplifiers used to intensify adjectives as it has been shown by several studies that mostamplifiers are used with adjectival heads. READ MORE

  3. 3. See how far we’ve come : A corpus study of the source metaphor JOURNEY

    University essay from Karlstads universitet/Institutionen för språk, litteratur och interkultur

    Author : Mohammad Miraz Hossain Khan; [2015]
    Keywords : conceptual metaphor theory; cognitive semantics; the source metaphor journey; teorin om konceptuella metaforer; kognitiv lingvistik; källmetaforen resa;

    Abstract : The present study is based on conceptual metaphor theory (CMT), which Lakoff and Johnson introduced in 1980. Data were taken from the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA), and three phrases (a long road, bumpy road and fork in the road) were investigated, in order to see how far the conceptual metaphor theory can be corroborated using authentic data. READ MORE

  4. 4. Thou Shalt Not Split...? : A Corpus-Based Study on Split Infinitives in American English

    University essay from Högskolan i Jönköping/Högskolan för lärande och kommunikation

    Author : Simon Johansson; [2015]
    Keywords : split infinitive; corpus linguistics; COHA; COCA; American English;

    Abstract : This essay aims to shed light on the prevalence of the to + adverb + verb and to not + verb split infinitives in American English, both in a historical perspective and in present day usage, and how it varies in different contexts where different levels of formality are expected. Although students are taught to avoid splitting constructions, numerous grammarians and linguists question this prescriptive viewpoint. READ MORE

  5. 5. Non-Standard "-ed" Forms of Selected Irreguslar Verbs: A Corpus-based Study of Present-day American English

    University essay from Göteborgs universitet/Institutionen för språk och litteraturer

    Author : Eric Wikström; [2013-06-28]
    Keywords : irregular verbs; -ed forms; non-standard usage; present-day American English; past participle; preterit; COCA Corpus of Contemporary American English ; standardization; variation; AAVE African America Vernacular English ; SWVE Southern White Vernacular English ;

    Abstract : This is a corpus-based study which aims to survey the parallel use of non-standard preterit and past participle "-ed" forms in a group of irregular verbs (namely "blow", "grow", "know", and "throw") in Present-day American English and to determine in what media, style registers, and text types such non-standard verb forms occur. The data for this analysis is provided by the Corpus of Contemporary American English (COCA) which comprises texts from the period of 1990 - 2010. READ MORE