The perceived innovativeness of the manufacturing process and perceived product quality. The case of creative and technology-intensive industries.

University essay from Lunds universitet/Företagsekonomiska institutionen

Abstract: Title: The perceived innovativeness of the manufacturing process and perceived product quality. The case of creative and technology-intensive industries. Course: BUSN39 Degree Project in Global Marketing Authors: Federica Piccone & Joanna Pilawa Supervisor: Javier Cenamor Keywords: manufacturing process; perceived innovativeness; perceived quality Thesis Purpose: The main purpose is to analyze the relationship between the perceived manufacturing process (PMP) innovativeness and the perceived quality. Additionally, potential contingencies related to the industry and price are examined. Methodology: The study follows an experimental design. The data is of a quantitative character, and for the analysis one-way and two-way Repeated Measures ANOVA is used for hypothesis testing. The dependent groups paired t-test served as a post hoc test following two-way repeated measures ANOVA. Theoretical Perspective: This study combines and puts in use concepts from the field of marketing regarding the postmodern customer, perception of quality, product attributes, and innovativeness. These act as a base for understanding the complex problem studied in this research. Empirical Data: The data were obtained through an online survey. The questions were of the 7 point attitude scale, and 100 valid responses were gathered. The target group was defined as both male and female over 18, residents of Central and Western Europe. Conclusions: Perceived manufacturing process (PMP) innovativeness influences the perception of quality. In the case of the creative industries, the relationship is negative, meaning that the low innovativeness is associated with higher perceived quality. While in technology-intensive industries, high innovativeness is a factor that positively affects perceived quality. Additionally, while introducing the price as a product attribute, the direction of the relationship remains unchanged for both industries. However, for the creative industries the gap between the levels of quality depending on innovativeness becomes even bigger when the price is in a higher range. While for technology-intensive industries it is exactly the opposite. All that illustrates that the PMP innovativeness can, and should be treated, as a product attribute and an argument in the decision making process. Practical implications: Perceived manufacturing process innovativeness should be treated as a product attribute and driver of perceived quality. It means that it may act as an asset while advertising the product and strengthening brand equity, which may lead to higher profit. It is crucial, however, to differentiate the elements of the process we should market based on the industry.

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